Terrorism, Fisk and General al-Sisi in Egypt…

“I ask … that next Friday all honest and trustworthy Egyptians must come out… Why come out? They come out to give me the mandate and order that I confront violence and potential terrorism.”

– General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, Chief of Egypt’s Armed Forces (quoted in The Guardian today http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/24/egypt-general-sisi-protest-terrorism?CMP=twt_fd)

It feels like the volume might have just been turned up a notch here in Egypt.

Today is the first time in a while I’ve gone looking for old quotes from Robert Fisk, but I was just reminded of how much a genius of journalism and history Fisk is, despite his rough track record of late:

“Terrorism” is a word that has become a plague on our vocabulary, the excuse and reason and moral permit for state-sponsored violence— our violence—which is now used on the innocent of the Middle East ever more outrageously and promiscuously. Terrorism, terrorism, terrorism. It has become a full stop, a punctuation mark, a phrase, a speech, a sermon, the be-all and end-all of everything that we must hate in order to ignore injustice and occupation and murder on a mass scale. Terror, terror, terror, terror. It is a sonata, a symphony, an orchestra tuned to every television and radio station and news agency report, the soap-opera of the Devil, served up on prime-time or distilled in wearyingly dull and mendacious form by the right-wing “commentators” of the American east coast or the Jerusalem Post or the intellectuals of Europe. Strike against Terror. Victory over Terror. War on Terror. Everlasting War on Terror. Rarely in history have soldiers and journalists and presidents and kings aligned themselves in such thoughtless, unquestioning ranks.”

― Robert Fisk, The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East, 2005

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About edgiles

Ed Giles is an award-winning Australian multimedia journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. Formerly based in Cairo, Egypt, Ed works with photography, video and multimedia production methods to explore in depth, human stories. In 2011, Ed was awarded a Walkley Award for Online Journalism, Australian's highest honour in the trade, for work with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Online Investigations Unit. In 2013, he was nominated for a second Walkley award, the Nikon-Walkley Award for Feature Photography, for work covering the overthrow of Egypt’s first democratically elected President, Mohammed Morsi, for Getty Images. Ed has also received the Australian Council of Deans of Education Award for Emerging Journalists in 2011, and a United Nations Media Peace Prize for Online Reporting in 2010. Ed has worked in Iran, Israel/Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Greenland, Burma, Nepal, the Caribbean Islands and French Polynesia, among other corners of the world. His work has been published and distributed by The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Independent (UK), Getty Images, Reuters Editor's Choice, ABC 7.30 Report, ABC Lateline, ABC News 24 and ABC News Online, The Age, The Herald Sun and The Jakarta Post. Ed’s photographic work is represented by Getty Images.

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